Tag Archives: motivation

Reaching Fitness Goals Part 6

I enjoy running. I really do. Even when it’s hard, even when I’m out of breath, even when I just want to quit, running is a positive activity for me. I often find when I’m stressed, angry, or upset, my first reaction is to go for a run. And the feeling of accomplishment when I go faster or further than I could before is incredible.

But sometimes, I still don’t make it out the door.

Aerial, on the other hand, I love. And I consistently have no trouble making it to class four, five, or even six days a week – sometimes twice a day. I feel like I could spend all day, every day in an aerial class and I would never get tired of it. Well, my muscles would get tired, but my brain wouldn’t! And that’s what brings me to Part 6 of my indefinitely long series of reaching fitness goals:

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Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

I read another book!

One day I’m going to have to come up with something to put in this “Aim to Improve” category other than the professional development books I read, but for now this is what I’ve got so it’s going to have to do.

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Reaching Fitness Goals: Part Five

It’s fun talking about things that happened nearly a month ago and all, but at some point I feel like I should start getting into where I’ve been for the past two months and why I was barely blogging. I do have a few good semi-decent excuses (I went to boyfriend’s house for Christmas and didn’t bring my laptop, I was on a cruise without internet access, etc.), but those only cover part of the time that I’ve been MIA and only tell a very small part of the story.

The short version of the story is that I sorta just let everything in my life fall apart. But that version sounds sad, and the real story isn’t that depressing, so I’m going to take it upon myself to tell it in full.

Over the summer I read a book about habits which taught me about something really important: keystone habits. Keystone habits are that one change you make that then spirals outward into a whole bunch more habits, all as a result of that very first one. Ideally, and in my case, that habit and the ones resulting from it are positive. So in January of last year I started training for a 10k. That meant running on a regular basis, which led to learning about and starting to implement proper training habits, which led to improving my nutritional profile and starting to do strength training, which led to losing weight and feeling awesome about myself, which led to flossing and using mouthwash every night to be even more awesome, which somewhere in there led to using a to-do list to track everything I needed to get done (i.e. blogging) and do it on time so that I fell into super-productivity and amazingness.

It was incredible. I felt like I had every part of my life super under control – and it had all started with a random inclination to run a 10K in Disney World. The one small problem with this method of habit forming, though, was that as soon as one thing fell apart… it all did.

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Motivational Crisis

I have to be honest, I’ve been having a really hard time the past few weeks. I touched on it briefly in a post a few weeks ago, because I thought I’d conquered it, but that was apparently only a temporary fix. It was barely a few days before my motivation took another deep dive into the depths of all-I-want-is-cookies. And then, last night, I hit a breaking point.

I’ve mentioned a few times before that, although I’m pretty happy with the way I look now, and I’m most certainly healthy, I want to lose just a few more pounds because I want my lower abs to show. And, in the time following my half marathon, I started to get impatient. I was feeling the stress of having been in a “trying to lose weight” state for almost a year, and I really, really wanted to get to the “maintaining your weight” stage. So, I took drastic measures.

I changed the settings on my calorie counting app to be at about a 400 calorie a day deficit. This may not seem like much, since most things you read will recommend a 500 calorie deficit (which I do not endorse), but because I’m so small this meant only about 1370 calories a day. In other words, not very much. Especially because I frequently get bored at work and look to (healthy) snacking to keep myself occupied. I was at a point where I’d see a 400 calorie recipe and think “no… that’s too much. I need it lighter.” Trust me, that is not a place you want to be.

Plus, because I was eating so little of everything else, I felt like I needed to be eating sweets of some sort every day just so that I didn’t feel like I was in some kind of forced self-deprivation. But this meant I was saving calories I should have been using on quality food for admittedly yummy, but nutritionally valueless desserts. Plus, as a person who has nearly always been moderate with my sweets, it meant I was drastically upping my sugar intake which was leading to some pretty nasty cravings.

Enter last night’s breaking point.

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Because Adult

November 7, 2014

I was going to write a Part Four to my Reaching Fitness Goals series tonight, but all I can think about right now is eating a cookie (hey, no one’s perfect) so I need to go to bed where I can at least dream about cookies. Unfortunately, that means you all get this super short, super lame post instead.

Look forward to Reaching Fitness Goals: Part Four on Monday and a post about motivational crises later in the week!

When You Start to Feel Discouraged (Suddenly, Despite Progress)

I’ve referenced the fact that I’ve lost a significant amount of weight more than a few times on this blog. I use “significant” a bit loosely, because I’m very short and was never overweight in the first place, but what I’ve lost ultimately adds up to about 16% of my original body weight, so it’s no small matter. Anyway, clarifications aside, there has been a significant improvement in the way that I look and the way that I feel about myself this past year.

Most of the time, I feel awesome. It sound silly to say, but I will freely admit that I’ve spent a bit of time admiring my smaller stomach in the mirror, particularly once the two-pack I’m currently rocking started to show and I got a few new muscle lines I didn’t even know I could have. I feel more comfortable in my clothes – I started wearing tighter shirts and shorter shorts and dresses, and I didn’t think twice about it (when before I absolutely hated shorts because I felt like my legs were too fat).

However, it’s hard to feel good about the way that you look 100% of the time, particularly in today’s society, and I am no exception to that rule. Occasionally, even though I know with every bit of logic available to me that I am perfectly healthy bordering on fit, I still feel fat. And that can be really difficult to deal with when you’ve worked so hard to get to where you are.

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