Tag Archives: myths

How to Hydrate

I ran six miles this morning. It took me about an hour. It was HOT. Like, 93º but feels like 105 hot. I lost 0.8 pounds. In an hour. From running. And no, running is not some magical exercise that can make you lose a pound an hour, though I wish it were.

The weight that I lost was water weight. And that was still after I had already drank back 16 oz (about a pound). So let’s talk about drinking water!

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Nutrition Myth: GMOs Cause Cancer (Or a Variety of Other Horrible, Scary Things)

Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMOs, are probably one of the most controversial, not-actually-controversial-at-all topics out there when it comes to food and food safety. It’s not uncommon to see websites or articles touting the claim that GMOs are inherently bad, unsafe, or unhealthy and that science has proved they aren’t fit for consumption. Many brands have started labeling themselves as “non-GMO,” and some states have considered passing laws that would require foods to label whether or not they contained GMOs.

So it wouldn’t be unreasonable to think that this is a hotly debated issue. But the truth is, every major scientific organization has officially stated that research has conclusively shown genetically modified food poses no significant health risk to humans. In other words, the anti-GMO movement is about as scientifically credible as anti-vaxxers. (Hint: Not even a little bit credible.)

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Nutrition Fiction: Low-Carb Diets Are Best (/Carbs Are Evil)

I have to start this post with a biology lesson. You probably already know that there are three macronutrients: carbohydrates, protein, and fat. These are our bodies’ sources of fuel, but they are not all treated equally.

The article I linked to above explains this quite well, and in more detail than I’m going to, but the short version is that carbohydrates are your body’s primary fuel source, largely because they are the easiest to break down. While your body can and will break fats and proteins down into energy, it takes longer than breaking down carbs and therefore, as a less efficient process, is not preferred by your body in most cases.

Fat contains the most energy potential per gram, so it is also commonly used by the body as a source of fuel – either in low intensity exercise where it has the time to break the fat down, or during endurance exercise in an attempt to preserve glycogen (sugar), which comes from carbs and is used by your body to create energy.

Finally, the least preferred source of fuel is protein. It is used in late stages of endurance exercise, when glycogen (sugar) runs really low and the body is forced to break protein into amino acids for fuel. However, this is not ideal because protein is much better used for other purposes – specifically muscle build and repair functions.

So that brings us to how low carb diets work.

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